Addiction, Boundaries, Codependency, Enablement:

10 Ways You Can Avoid Enabling An Addict

18 May 2012 by Recovering You, 4 Comments »

Enabling An Addict

Common and wise advice for anyone living with and loving an addict is that we must not enable the addiction.

Enablement is any activity or behaviour that provides the means or opportunity for a person to do something. In the context of this article, enabling is providing the opportunity for an addict to engage in their addiction.

The problem is that it can be incredibly confusing as we try to work out what constitutes enabling, and how to avoid doing it.

The following 10 points are ways that you can stop enabling the addict in your life, recover your sense of control, and hopefully stall the person you love’s descent into disaster.

  1. Stop providing money that allows an addict to gamble, purchase drugs, alcohol, or participate in any other addictive behaviours. Think of giving money as basically giving an addict drugs or a problem gambler, permission to gamble.
  2. Do not pay bills, fines, rent, or food expenses. Saying No is your prerogative and without feeling the impact of being unable to cover these costs, no true hardship is experienced and consequences are avoided.
  3. Avoid repaying loans the addict has accrued or providing money to pay back ‘friends’ they have borrowed money from. Again, an addict needs to experience the discomfort when those monies are requested from them repeatedly.
  4. Do not lie, cover up or trivialize the facts about an addicts actions or behaviour. That’s not to say that you need to shout out to the world the situation your loved one is in but if someone genuinely enquires give them the truth without sharing all the finer details.
  5. Stop making excuses for an addict or helping them by calling in sick or apologizing for them not attending events or appointments. When you make it easier for them to check out of their ‘normal’ life, you make it easier for them to fall into the shadows of addiction.
  6. Do not do anything for an addict that they should be able to do for themselves when sober or clean. By taking responsibility for the tasks they should otherwise be able to do, you support them in taking advantage of you.
  7. Avoid joining an addict in their activities. This includes buying Lottery tickets if you have a partner who gambles or buying alcohol and drinking around an alcoholic. Let the person you love know by example that you do not support their choices.
  8. Do not lend, gift or give an addict items they can sell or pawn for money. Any item with even a minor value is easy cash for an addict. They can be incredibly resourceful in trading goods, for money.
  9. Set boundaries and stick to them. Do not make threats. Do not back down on your consequences. Doing so enables an addict to simply push harder when they meet resistance, knowing you will likely back down again.
  10. Be aware of codependent tendencies that cause you to want to rescue or save your addict. Codependency is defined as taking an excessively passive, caretaking or controlling role in your relationship with an addict. This is always detrimental to both their possible recovery and yours.

It takes time to become aware of the ways we enable the addict in our life but perhaps with the information in this list you can begin to remove the factors that are causing you, and your addict more harm than good.

And remember, what we do when we enable comes from a place of love, and all of our intentions at the time are good. Please don’t punish yourself or feel guilty for having done anything that may have contributed to the ongoing course of your loved ones addiction. But DO begin to remove the safety nets that prevent the addict in your life from ever having to feel, recognize and face what they have become stuck in.

Only by doing so, can they have any chance of making the decision to free themselves.

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4 Comments

  1. [...] and they often find that one person who is committed to their cause, and who can ultimately enable them long after those others who have pulled [...]

  2. Good article. It takes some of us a looooooooooooong time to get to this realization and truth. I have a website devoted to families of addicts and also published a book titled Enabling Love and would welcome your input on my blog or website.
    Thank you!

    Laura McAlpine

    • Recovering You says:

      Hi Laura

      Thanks for your comment.

      I checked out your blog and you do a wonderful job speaking to, and supporting a group that I often feel have it the toughest in this battle. Parents. I have forwarded your link on to a few close friends that I have come to know through addiction, who are parents. I think you could really help them : )

  3. Julie Grady says:

    Thanks… I just needed to hear it.

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